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  • Halloween (2007)

    Posted in: Disc Reviews by David Annandale on January 12th, 2008

    Overall
    Features
    Film
    Video
    Audio
    (out of 5)

    The trailer trash Myers family (inexplicably living in a pretty big house) is a powder keg waiting to go off, what with the rampaging abuse and a young Michael (the admittedly creepy Daeg Faerch) butchering small animals and looking like he’s mad as hell and soon not going to take it anymore. Snap he does, going on a killing spree, before he is captured and locked up for years, while eccetric shrink Dr. Loomis (a shameless Malcolm McDowell) making a career out of trying to learn what makes him tick. Growing to Godzilla proportions, Michael makes his escape, and proceeds to pick up his spree where he left off in his home town of Haddonfield.

    I trashed this fiasco in a Brain Blasters column back in September, and the unrated version of the film does nothing to change my opinion. Zombie misses the fact that restraint of the original film was a large part of its success, stupidly gives Michael a backstory and thus nixes his fearsome aspect as supernatural boogeyman, distractingly fills small roles with Look Who It Is cameos (Udo Kier, Richard Lynch, Brad Dourif), and, after expanding the original movie’s single shot prologue to an entire act, compresses the actual rampage to the point that there is no time for character development, and so we care not a whit for the victims. An idiotic, crashing bore.

    Audio

    Some kinda snazzy doom-laden musical cues mark each intertitle of the film, and the score at those moments shakes the rafters. Talk about enveloping. The rest of the time, the audio track is pretty average. It’s perfectly crisp and clear (but the contrary for a recent wide release would be highly surprising), but feels a little bit thin.

    Video

    Everything clicks along here. Much of the film takes place at night (natch) and the contrasts are excellent – there is no bleaching, and though the dark is very, very dark, the picture isn’t murky. The colours are strong and as lurid as one could wish for. There is no grain or visible edge enhancement. The reproduction of the theatrical viewing experience is damn near perfect.

    Special Features

    Disc 1 has Rob Zombie’s commentary track, and he’s such an articulate, enthusiastic host, who so clearly loves the medium, that I really wish I liked his movie better. Disc 2 has more thoughts from Zombie as optional commentary on the 18 (!) deleted scenes and the alternate commentary. Sheer volume shows up again with a whopping 15 casting sessions (as if this were a Robert Altman ensemble piece) along with the screen test for Scout Taylor-Compton’s Laurie Strode. The making-of featurettes break down into three areas: “The Many Masks of Michael Myers” is exactly what its title says, “Meet the Cast” (ditto) and “Re-Imagning Halloween” is a more substantial three-parter (“From Camera to Screen”, “The Production Design” and “Makeup FX, Props and Wardrobe”). Zombie’s engaging presence and the specific focus of the featurettes raise them somewhat above the usual promotional efforts. The usual filler is here too: bloopers, the theatrical trailer, and four trailers for other releases.

    Closing Thoughts

    Zombie is such a fan of horror that not only do I wish his movie were better, I wish he’d had the sense not to go near it in the first place. He’s much better off with his own material. Here’s hoping he gets back to that for next time.

    Posted In: 2-Disc, Alliance Films, Director's Cut, Disc Reviews, Dolby Digital 5.1 (English), DVD, Horror, Unrated Edition

    One Response to “Halloween (2007)”

    1. Franky Says:

      I agree with you, this was a horrible horrible movie, just like all his other films

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